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September 18, 2017

Was Your Ancestor in Debtor's Prison?

Here is another database I stumbled on for Yorkshire England. It is the website for York Castle which housed a debtor's prison. There is a brief history of the prison, the environment of the prison, a few prisoner biographies, and a few turnkey (guard) biographies.

By going to York Castle Family History Section you can search for an ancestor who was in the prison, either for debt or for criminal actions. Not all prisoners are listed as the database currently has prisoners from the 18th Century. I'm looking for William Elgie who I know was there in 1818 so am out of luck this time but it's a fascinating database with over 5000 names!

There is a very nice factsheet for tips on how to track down any missing prisoners and I am planning to use it find more on William if possible. I was able to find that York Castle Museum holds miscellaneous records from York Castle prison, including "Notebook with notes on various prisoners in York Castle, extracted from 1803-1868".  Next step is to write to them and ask how/if I can access these records.


September 17, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 61 V


This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

 Hopital auxiliare (2). St Germain en Saye.  1 Editih Griffin 2 Mdm Suffier 3 Alice Griffin

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 16, 2017

Church Plans to Dig Up 400 Graves

Over 400 bodies are known to be buried under a parking lot in Hamilton Ontario.  Richard Beasley, an early settler, is one of those buried there.

Christ Church Cathedral now plans to dig up the graves, identify them, and re-bury them so that they can build a 12-storey condo.

“It’s time that we stopped parking on top of those people,” said the Very Rev. Peter Wall, rector of Christ’s Church Cathedral, in a presentation to councillors Wednesday. “They need to be released from asphalt hell.”

The graveyard opened in 1832 and 20 years later it was closed. Many headstones were moved at that time but the bodies were left behind. The Cathedral has gathered and saved 24 tombstones which they are storing in the church basement.

From a personal viewpoint, many of my Peer ancestors as well as my Burkholder ancestors died in the Hamilton area in the early to mid 1800s. I am hopeful their remains will be found and identified.

Continue reading the full story at Hamilton church aims to dig up hundreds of graves from ‘asphalt hell’ for condo tower

Credit: Image of Christ Church Cathedral in Public Domain found on Wikipedia

September 15, 2017

Lockwood Descendants - Here's a Family Bible


With thanks to Annette P., Olive Tree Genealogy is pleased to share this page from a bible belonging to the Lockwood family.

These are BIRTHS in the left-hand column.

Obediah Johnson Feb. 26, 1788
Anna Shelden May 21, 1789
John B. Johnson Sept. 1, 1810
Lucy Johnson Oct. 10, 1812
Frances Johnson Dec. 31, 1814
Angeline & Emeline Nov. 25, 1817
Robert G. Dec. 2, 1821
Abel Douglas March 2, 1824
Reuben Oct. 1x, 1826

The right-hand column appears to be the marriage of Sylvester Lockwood b June 9, 1807 and Angeline Johnson b. Nov. 25, 1817 with a list of their children underneath. I have listed their names and years of birth below but the image provides full detail of date of birth.

Cornelia M. 1838
Martha Jane 1840
James 1842
Frank 1844
Irena 1847
Stephen 1849
Elizabeth 1851
Charles Herbert 1854
Willis 1858

I have another page from this Lockwood family bible and will be posting it here on Olive Tree Genealogy blog soon.

You might also like to check out the blog Family Bibles for more bible genealogy records.

September 13, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 10


Another great candid shot! These photos were taken in the 1920s and I love how often family members got together. It looks like they had a lot of fun too.

Here we have Sarah Trucksell, Margaret Facey, Mary Elgie (mother, meaning Mary Louise Facey Elgie, the mother of Florence Elgie who owned this album), and Aunt Edith Facey


September 12, 2017

Stevensen, Jacobsen, van Brakel (and more) Descendants Won't Want to Miss This!

Steven Janse was baptised in October 1617 in Nijkerk, Gelderland Holland. A search of church records revealed the names of his parents and grandparents, as well as siblings. These records are all included in this book. In 1636 when Steven was only 18, the Bubonic Plague struck and most of his family died.

Steven and his wife Maria Goosens arrived in New Netherland circa 1648. By 1655 they were living apart and eventually sought a legal divorce in 1663. BOth remarried and Maria had one more child - a son born illegitimately, his father unknown.

Their stories and their descendants to 3 generations are all discussed in this book which is fully sourced with over 250 footnotes. Some of their descendant surnames discussed are Stevensen, Jacobsen, Coning, van Fulpen, Matthews, van Brakel, Erwin, Sebra, Roberts, Darkens, van Veen, Schouten, Fell, Borsie, Kloppers, vanderVolgen, Anderson, Smock, Gleave, Charlton, Pasco, Maurits and Cuyler

 I've published a 118 page book on these families called New Netherland Settlers: Stevensen & Jacobsen: A genealogy to three generations of the descendants of Maria Goosens and her husband Steven Janse and a man named Jacob (Jacobszen Family) (Volume 5)
 
Available on Amazon.com , Amazon.ca and Createspace

September 11, 2017

Calling Van Valkenburg Descendants!

Official Seal of New Netherland
Are you a Van Valkenburg descendant? I am.

My 9th great-grandfather Lambert Van Valkenburg was born in the Netherlands circa 1614. With his wife Annetje Jacobs, Lambert sailed for the New World of New Netherland (present day New York state). 

From his son Jochem Lambertse Van Valkenburg, there are 10 recognized branches of the Van Valkenburg family (one for each of Jochem's children with his wife Eva Vrooman) and I descend from two - his son Isaac Jochemse (with wife Lydia Van Slyke) and Isaac's sister Jannetje Jochemse (with husband Isaac Van Alstyne)

If you too have Van Valkenburg (and variant spellings) ancestors, you might be interested in our Van Valkenburg Facebook Group 

Also take a peek at the information I researched and published online at at Lambert Van Valkenburg in The New World

I also wrote three books on the Vollick and Follick descendants of Lambert Van Valkenburg. They are: 


From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: The Loyalist Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick and his Vollick & Follick Children (Volume 1) 

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V. 2 Cornelius Vollick and his Follick and Vollick Descendants to 3 Generations 

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V. 3: The Loyalist Storm Follick and his Follick and Vollick descendants in North America



Records found for Lambert indicate he was in New Amsterdam as early as Jan. 1644. Since it is unlikely the ships sailed in the winter, he was probably in New Amsterdam in the summer or fall of 1643. Existing records indicate he purchased land in July 1644. That 1644 plot of land  is now the site of the Empire State Building in New York City.

29 July 1644: Deed. Jan Jacobssen to Lambert van Valckenburgh, of house and plantation on the island of Manhattan, near Fort Amsterdam. [Register of Provincial Secretary Vol. II p. 121] [Source: Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany NY edited by EB O'Callaghan]

16 March 1647: Patent. Lammert van Valckenborch; lot south of Fort Amsterdam, Manhattan Island. [Land Papers Vol. G.G. p. 192] [Source: Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany NY edited by EB O'Callaghan]

Court records are a wonderful resource. Those of us with ancestors in early New Netherland are lucky for the Dutch kept meticulous records. It was a litigious time period and settlers were frequently in court suing their friends and neighbours. Lambert is found many times in the court records for New Netherland. Here is one of the more volatile examples:

Source:"Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck 1657-1660", translated and edited by A.J.F. Van Laer, Vol.2, Albany, 1923. Page 9:
"Ordinary Session held in Fort Orange, January 9 Anno 1657

"President, J. La Montagne, Rutger Jacobsen, Jacob Schermerhoorn, Andries Herbertsen, Philip Pietersen

"Lambert van Valckenborch, plaintiff, against Henderick Claessen and Gerrit Willemsen, defendants.The plaintiff complains that the defendants beat him and his wife in his own house. The defendants deny it and claim that the plaintiff chased them with a naked rapier out of his house and pursued them to the center of the fort. The court orders the parties respectively to prove their assertions."

In 1659 Lambert was appointed to the Rattle Watch. The Rattle Watch was responsible for walking the streets at night, watching for crimes or fires and from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. they called out the hour every hour as well as ringing their rattles.

Source:"Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck 1657-1660", translated and edited by A.J.F. Van Laer, Vol.2, Albany, 1923: Page 209-210:"Extraordinary Session held in Fort Orange, August 8 Anno 1659

"Instructions issued by the honorable commissary and magistrates of Fort Orange and the village of Beverwyck for the rattle watch, appointed at the request of the burghers to relieve them of night-watch duty; to the rattle watch of which place Lambert van Valckenborgh and Pieter Winnen were appointed the 6th of July of this year 1659, on condition that they together are to receive for the term of one year one thousand and one hundred guilders in seawan and one hundred guilders in beavers.

Read more about Lambert from the Court Records online at Lambert Van Valkenburg in The New World This was first published as "Lambert Van Valkenburg: His Life in the New World as Revealed in Court Documents and Other Primary Source Records From 1644 - 1664" by Lorine McGinnis Schulze in The National Association of the Van Valkenburg Family of America serialized beginning in the Fall of 1999

September 10, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 46 R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

Postcard. Abbeville. Air raid. Sept 1915

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 9, 2017

Are You a Pier or Peer Descendant?

My 4th great-grandfather Jacob Peer, the immigrant ancestor to Ontario, was living in Newton Township, Sussex County, New Jersey in 1774. Jacob was forced to leave New Jersey because of his British sympathies during the American Revolution. He settled near Hamilton Ontario in June 1796.

Jacob and his family lost everything in New Jersey and settled in what was then the wilderness of Upper Canada where they had to make a new life for themselves. Jacob and his 6 sons and 2 daughters had many descendants settling in Ontario, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Illinois.

This is one of the immigrant families I researched and wrote about in a 6-volume set called The Peer Family in North America. The hardships they endured were felt by many in those turbulent times and I wanted their stories told.

The available Peer Family books are:

Peer Family in North America: V.1 Jacob & Anne Peer, Immigrants from New Jersey to Upper Canada in 1796. Revised Edition published April 2016

The Peer Family in North America: V.2 Levi Peer & Elizabeth Marical and their Descendants to 3 Generations

The Peer Family in North America: V.3 Edward Peer & His Two Wives and their Descendants to 3 Generations

The Peer Family in North America: V.4 Philip Peer & his two Wives Ester Dunn and Susan Griniaus and their Descendants to 3 Generations 

The Peer Family in North America: V. 5 Stephen Peer & His Wife Lydia Skinner and their Descendants to 3 Generations 

The Peer Family in North America: V6 Jacob Peer Jr. and his wife Lucy Powers and their Descendants to 2 Generations     

Why not join our Peer Genealogy Group on Facebook? You can share with other members, ask for help with a challenging Peer or Pier ancestor and join in discussions.

1797, 13 July: Declared in his land petition that he came to the province in June 1796 and had a wife and daughter in Barton where he owned a farm.  He was granted 200 acres on 14 July 1797. A statement by Nathaniel Pettit dated 10 July 1797 states that he was acquainted with Jacob Pear [sic] in the State of New Jersey, and that because he was "much attached to the British Constitution" he "suffered greatly both in his person and property in the Late War between Great Britain and America"



 

September 8, 2017

Two Van Slyke Books for Van Slyke Descendants

Another new book! If you are tracing your Van Slyke ancestors you might want to check out my TWO books on the family.

Cornelis Antonissen Van Slyke & Ots-Toch

The Van Slyke Family in America: A Genealogy of Cornelise Antonissen Van Slyke, 1604-1676 and his Mohawk Wife Ots-Toch, including the story of Jacques Hertel, 1603-1651, Father of Ots-Toch and Interpreter to Samuel de Champlain REVISED EDITION The Van Slyke Family in America: A Genealogy of Cornelise Antonissen Van Slyke, 1604-1676 and his Mohawk Wife Ots-Toch, including the story of Jacques Hertel, 1603-1651, Father of Ots-Toch and Interpreter to Samuel de Champlain REVISED EDITION Coil bound 8.5x11. 287 p. Download an Order Form to pay by check or pay using Paypal



and secondly ---

Cornelis' nephew Willem Pieterse Van Slyke

New Netherland Settlers: Willem Pieterse Van Slyke aka Willem Neef: A genealogy to 5 generations of the descendants of Willem Pieterse Van Slyke (Volume 10) Available from CreateSpace and on Amazon.com or Amazon.ca 180 pages

September 7, 2017

New Book on Captn. Adriaen Post of New Netherland

Are you a descendant of Captain Adriaen Post? The Dutchman Adriaen Crijnen Post and his wife Claartje (Clara) Moockers are found in Recife Brazil in 1646. By the time Brazil fell to the Portuguese in 1654 Adriaen and his femily had left for the Netherlands. From there they sailed to New Netherland.

As a representative of Baron van der Capellan, Adriaen established a thriving colonly on Staten Island. The colony was burned to the ground in the Peach Tree War in 1655 and 23 colonists were killed by Indians. Adriaen, his wife, 5 children and 2 servants were among the 67 colonists taken prisoner.

This book in my New Netherland Settlers series follows Adriaen and Clara in New Netherland and also provides information on their children and grandchildren.

September 6, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 9

 

What a great candid photo! It looks like these two are having fun doing the dishes. The woman, identified as Ethel Finch, is no doubt having quite a chuckle over the man, Roy Facey, wearing an apron and doing "woman's work"!

Roy Facey was born in 1890 and was the brother of my husband's great-grandmother Mary Louise Facey Elgie. I believe that Ethel is the 27 year old daughter of Hugh and Mary Finch found in the 1921 census for St. Mary's Ontario. 

September 5, 2017

Update of FamilySearch Ending Mirofilm Circulation Services

Thursday, September 7, 2017, marks the closing of an 80-year era of historic records access to usher in a new, digital model. FamilySearch is discontinuing its microfilm circulation services in concert with its commitment to make billions of the world’s historic records readily accessible digitally online.

 (See FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). As its remaining microfilms are digitized, FamilySearch has provided additional information to users of its historic microfilm program.

Continue reading a list of helpful facts and tips to help patrons better navigate the transition from microfilm to digital at http://media.familysearch.org/update-familysearch-digital-records-access-replacing-microfilm/

September 4, 2017

Top 100 Genealogy Books

Did you know that Amazon has books on Genealogy? There are technical genealogy books, fiction genealogy books (mysteries, adventure, historical and more), DNA for genealogists, tutorial and helpful genealogy books and so on.

I like to start at Amazon's list of the Top 100 Genealogy Books which is updated hourly. That's right - hourly. Spoiler Alert! My mystery novel "Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery" is at the Number 25 spot as of August 20, 2017 at 11 am EDT. And since I kind of love co-incidences, notice that my book has 25 4 1/2 star reviews :-)

I'd love to get it to Number 1! Failing that, if I could get it to the first page (#1-20) that would be super!

"Organize Your Genealogy in Evernote in 10 Easy Steps" (by yours truly) is not doing as well. It's in Number 68 spot!

So even though I'd love for my readers to boost my book by purchasing a copy OR giving it a decent review if you already own it, my main goal with this blog post is to encourage you to take a peek on Amazon for genealogy books you might like to read!


September 3, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 58 R




This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.
Postcard. Netheravon Cavalry School. "Hospital Units and Sisters Officers' Mess rooms"

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

September 1, 2017

1931 Autograph Book Found in Bookstore

A bookstore in London Ontario recently discovered an old box sitting in their basement. Inside were various items - school workbooks, a telegram and among the items, a small green leather autograph book inscribed "To Margaret on her 11th Birthday. Dec. 21, 1931"

This child's book, passed on and saved all these years, is now in the London room of the local library. Perhaps Margaret's descendants or relatives will find the book and enjoy reading through it to share what Margaret MacQueen's friends wrote to her so many years ago.

Thanks to Annette Fulford for spotting this story on CBC News.


August 31, 2017

Check out Ancestry Free Access for Labor Day Weekend

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Databases searched include census records, tax and assessment records, employment records, military records, voter registrations and more. Don't miss this chance to look for your ancestors.

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Search Ancestry.ca Labour Day Free Access to Occupational Records all Weekend Long

August 30, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 8

What a great photo! You can see what it says on the reverse (image below) but I'll list the people left to right starting with the front row:

On grass: Donna Bragg, Helena Massey (my mother-in-law), Luella Conn (Helena's mother) 
Middle row seated: William Elgie  holding Roberta Bragg, Joan Elgie, Mary Louise Facey Elgie, Margaret Wilford Facey
Back row standing: Florence Elgie Hooper, Harry Elgie, Annie Elgie


August 28, 2017

Got Scottish Ancestors?

I recently discovered a new (to me) website when searching for my former daughter-in-law's Scottish ancestors.

The website Scottish Indexes explains

"The aim of this website is to help you trace your Scottish family tree and find out more about the lives of your ancestors by helping you access historic documents that are here in Scotland.
We have a wide range of indexes from birth, marriage, death and census records to mental health and prison records. You can search all of our indexes from this page or you can go to our 'Record Sets' page and search by individual category. Find out exactly what we have indexed so far on our coverage page."
It's a mix of records. For example I found this record:

Register of Extracted Decrees

PursuerHelen Murie, daughter of Robert Murie, Balfron, Stirlingshire
DefenderThomas Bulloch, Watchmaker & Jeweller, Strathaven
Year of Child's Birth1880
Year Extract Isssued1880
Sheriff CourtHamilton
CountyLanarkshire
NRS ReferenceSC37/7/25 p. 15
The site gives me two options to purchase the record since this is an index only. The options are:

1. the full record for a small fee
2. full record plus a transcription for a slightly larger fee

If you have Scottish ancestors you may want to give this site a look.


August 27, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 49 V

49V summer chapel le treport


This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

August 25, 2017

Meme: Our Immigrant Ancestors - Hendrick Meesen Vrooman

There is a lot of discussion about immigration in America right now. Tempers have flared, and different groups hold various strong opinions.

I've been following this for several months and it occurs to me that those of us in Canada, America, and Australia have immigrant ancestors. Have you researched yours? Do you know who they were, why they came to your country and when? Do you know how they fared once settled in their new land? Were they welcomed? Were they shunned? Was their discrimination based on their religion or ethnic origin? These are all questions that are important, and interesting to discover. With that in mind, I'm the dedicating Saturdays (as many as needed) as the day to join me in discussing your immigrant ancestors.

You will be able to read any you are interested in by using the keyword Immigrant Ancestors. I'm going to share on OliveTreeGenealogy blog what I know of my immigrant ancestors to North America (whether that is USA or Canada)

One of my Dutch immigrant ancestors was Hendrick Meesen Vrooman born ca 1617 in Holland. Hendrick Bartholomeus (Meesen) and 5 children sailed to New Netherland (New York) on D'Eendracht (The Concord) in 1664.

I've written a book about Hendrick and his brothers which is available on Amazon as "The Vrooman Family: Ancestors & Descendants of the Brothers Hendrick Meesen Vrooman, Pieter Meesen Vrooman and Jacob Meesen Vrooman of New Netherland (New York)" (Volume 8 of my New Netherland Settlers series)

You might also like to join our Vrooman Facebook Group to share stories, and ask for help with a challenging Vrooman ancestor.

Hendrick was 47 years old and with him were his five children including his daughter, my 8th great grandmother Eva Hendrickse Vroomn. Eva was 14 years old. Hendrick was a widower, his youngest child was only 5 years old. Their ship, De Eendracht, arrived in the harbour 19 July 1664.

Six months after his arrival, Hendrik wrote a letter to his family in Leiden: his brother Jacob, his sister Maartje and his mother Ariaantje. In it he described the new land he has come to, and asked for items from home such as silk thread.

 The amazement about the new environment is thus still fresh at the time of writing and some passages of  Hendriks letter state:

It has been a good summer there. Very fine corn has grown there and the cultivation was good and the land still pleases me. At snechtendeel [Schenectady and the surrounding area] the land is more beautiful than I have ever seen in Holland.
 The year in which Hendrick arrived in New Netherland (1664) is the year in which New Netherland was taken by the English. Hendrik writes of this in his letter:

Furthermore I let you know that there have arrived three English ships at the Manhattans with soldiers and they have claimed the land and they say that it belongs to their king. And Stuyvesant has given it to them without one shot, with an agreement.

In 1690 Hendrick, his son Bartholmew aged 30, his son Adam with his wife Engeltie and their six children (Barent 11, Wouter 9, Peter 5, Christina 4, Hendrick 3 and a male infant) were living in Schenectady. Then came the Indian and French attack on Schenectady on the cold snowy evening of Saturday February 9, 1690.

On 9 February 1690, in the total of 60 people killed at the Schenectady Massacre, were Hendrick, his son Bartholomew aka Bartol, and two black slaves who were killed and burned by Indians. His two remaining sons, Adam and Jan, were left to inherit his estate. Hendrick's grandsons Barent and Wouter were taken captive to Canada but later recovered. Hendrick's son Adam escaped with his three children Peter, Christina and Hendrick.

The report of the investigating party sent out from Albany states:

"Hend. Meese Vrooman and Bartholomeus Vrooman kild & burnt....Item 2 Negroes of Hend Meese ye same death....Engel the wife of Adam Vrooman shot & burnt, her childe the brains dashed out against ye wall...."

Hendrik's life story illustrates the guts and perseverence of the Dutch colonists in New-Netherland: they left their safe home behind and built themselves a new life in a wonderful, but harsh country. 350 years later, Hendrik's letter does not only offer us a unique view of the fortunes of a Dutchman in New-Netherland, but also of the unpolished history of development of a nation. This makes his letter a great ego document to celebrate the Hudson year. (http://hum.leiden.edu/research/letters-as-loot/archive/monthly-letter.html)


Sources:

The letter is kept in HCA 30-226-1. A first diplomatic transcription was made by Netty van Megen for the Wikiscripta Neerlandica project. The comment on this monthly letter is provided by Judith Nobels. The quotations of the letter have been translated freely. See http://hum.leiden.edu/research/letters-as-loot/archive/monthly-letter.html


August 23, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 7


This photo taken in 1916 shows William Elgie and his wife Mary Louise Facey with their children Harry (b. 1907), Anne (b. 1912) and baby Florence (b. 1914).


This photo is labelled "Miss Bradbury (Ingersoll) & Annie Edythe Elgie Mitchell"

Unfortunately we have Annie Edythe Elgie married to Robert Bragg so we cannot explain the reference to her as Mitchell.

There was one more tiny photo, which looked like it had been torn from a larger one, tucked into the plastic sleeve with the photo dated 1916.


This photo is labelled "Grandma Facey, Annie Edythe Elgie Mitchell". Grandma Facey is Margaret Wilford, wife of Samuel Facey. Annie Edythe was her granddaughter and daughter of William Elgie and Mary Louise Facey.

August 21, 2017

Finding a Yorkshire England Ancestor

Recently I discovered a goldmine of information my husband's Yorkshire Elgie ancestors. His Elgie ancestors lived in North Yorkshire, and while researching that area I discovered the North Yorkshire archives website.

A search of the North Yorkshire County Record Office online catalogue using their "Quick Catalogue Search" box resulted in 32 "hits" for the surname Elgie.

Clicking on each one in turn brings up more details, including reference numbers which are needed to order copies of the full document.


Not being able to find an online form or method of ordering documents online I wrote to the
the North Yorkshire Archives (Archives@northyorks.gov.uk) with this email:
Hello
I have found several records for my ELGIE family that I would like to order from your online index of your catalogue.
I was not able to find how to submit my request for copies. I am happy to have digital copies sent by email but I can accept them in any format you use.
There are 5 items - here is one example:
1818 papers for the opinion of the Justices relating to the petitions of John White and William Elgie insolvent debtors [2 items] [North Riding of Yorkshire Quarter Sessions. Easter Quarter Sessions. Document QSB 1818 2/14]

Can I send you a list of document numbers by email to order copies?
Thank you for any help you can offer me.
It didn't take long before I received an email from the North Yorkshire County Record Office with the following information:

If you would like to order copies, payment can be made by cheque payable to North Yorkshire County Council and sent to us at The County Record Office, Malpas Road, Northallerton, North Yorkshire DL7 8TB. We can also accept payment by credit or debit card (except American Express), but we advise that you let us know card details by post or telephone, as we cannot guarantee the security of information sent electronically.  Our telephone number is 01609 777585.
Next I mailed (old school postal) my request along with my credit card information and within a few weeks I had copies of five documents ranging from 1797 to 1822 for the Elgie ancestor of interest. The cost for those five documents was $20.00 Canadian. How amazing is that! And from the documents I learned, among other things, that my husband's 5th great-grandfather William Elgie was in debtor's prison in York when he requested a pardon so he could leave prison and repay his debts.

If you have North Yorkshire ancestors you should give this site a good look.

August 20, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 56R

Netheravon Church. Rector Mr. Chorley

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 46 V

 Newspaper clippings.  1 - Wounded includes Capt. Gatherer.  2 - Canada's Matron, with a dated autograph of 8_1_16
 

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

August 19, 2017

Hans Coenradt & Barentje Straetsman in New Netherland



The exact date of Hans Coenradt’s arrival in New Netherland is not known but we know he would have been among the refugees fleeing Recife Brazil in April 1654. Presumably the family continued on to New Netherland soon after arriving safely in the Netherlands. The first record found indicating he was in New Netherland is dated in Albany (Fort Orange) in early December 1655.  [i] So sometime between April 1654 and December 1655, Hans (and probably his entire family) arrived in New New Netherland.

As New Amsterdam came into view with its gallows and weather beaten wooden houses dominating a raw, windswept landscape, the Barheit family must have had mixed feelings. New Amsterdam in 1654 was a frontier outpost filled with brawling sailors and rough-looking fur traders. Over fifty grog houses catered to a never-ending stream of men dropping in for a little fun on their way to or from Massachusetts or Virginia. [ii]

Many researchers believe that Barentje stayed behind in the Netherlands and arrived in New Netherland for the first time in 1660. Records reveal that Barentje and two children left Amsterdam between 22 December 1659 and 8 January 1660 on board the ship de Trouw. The ship sailed into the harbour at New Amsterdam some time before 6 June 1660.  [iii] However it is unlikely that this was her Barentje’s first trip, since it occurred at least five years after her husband’s arrival. Barentje more than likely returned to the Netherlands on either business reasons or to visit family, and this 1660 arrival is her return voyage.

We find records of Barentje in New Netherland as early as August 1658 when she was called a whore by Pieter Jansen. Her sister defended her vigourously and Pieter took her sister to court in New Amsterdam. [iv] This suggests that the 1660 voyage was not her first time to New Netherland.

The late Pim Nieuwenhuis’ abstracts from notarial documents in the Amsterdam Archives reveal that on 16 August 1659, Barentje was in Amsterdam conducting business on behalf of her sister Teuntje. [v] It seems obvious that Barentje, her legal affairs in order, then booked passage on the next ship to New Netherland – de Trouw leaving after 22 Decemember 1659.

This is an excerpt from my book
 

The Barheit Family Revealed: A Genealogy of Hans Coenradt and Barentje Jans Straetsman, the Immigrant Ancestors of the Barheit Family of Albany New York available  on CreateSpace and Amazon.com

Publication Date: Apr 21 2016
ISBN/EAN13: 1987938062 / 9781987938067
Page Count: 60
Trim Size: 8.5" x 11"
 
[i] CFOB V1.1920 p.242 Hans was called as a witness in a case about stolen sugar cookies
[ii] They Came From Recife: the First Jews to Settle in America 1654. Dr. Kenneth Libo Ph.D and Michael Skakun
[iii] http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/nnship77.shtml
[iv] RNA. Vii p 427. 27 August 1658. Pieter Jansen pltf vs Teuntje Straaatmans [sic] deft. Pltf delivers in court certain written complaint for the insults and abuse given him, pltf, by the deft. Deft. Admits having done so, but did not threaten him with a knife, and says the pltf abused her sister for a whore and her as one who steals. Plft denies it and says she, the deft., abused his wife as a thief, and threatened him with a knife, which Leuntje Pieters knows. Deft says the pltf abused her three times in the first instance. Parties charged by the Court to keep themselves quiet and peaceable and whichever of the two should begin again, shall pay 25 gl as a fine to the Schout
[v] NNC. V. 5 No. 3. 2000 p 78. 16 August 1659. Not. H. Schaef, 1359/106. Barentje Straetsmans, housewife of Hans Coenraets from Beerhey, now a free baker near Fort Orange in New Netherland, being a sister of Theuntke [sic] Straetsmans (the wife of Thielman Jacobsz from Caerick who sailed in 1646 on the ship Rhee van Zeeland to Brazil and who died later in Gaudeloupe, now declares in the name of her sister Theuntje Straetsmans now living in Manhattan, that she has received a full account of the wages earned by her late husband. (Note that in fact Thielman had not died in Gaudaloupe and reappeared some years later after Theuntje had remarried as his widow)

August 16, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 6





"Harry Elgie at Lot 24, Concession 7, East Nissouri. the Will Elgie Farm, now Harry Elgie Farm"

As near as I can tell, the Harry Elgie in this photo is Harry the son of William Elgie and Mary Louise Facey. Harry was born in E. Nissouri in 1907, and married Madge Brown in 1936.



On back of photo is this notation: "Sam and Margaret Facey. Grandpa & Grandma Facey." Underneath is a notation that seems to read "Of Anne Elgie Mitchell"

I am not sure what the second notation refers to, because I only know of two Anne Elgie women - one married Alexander Pelton, the other married Robert Bragg and was the mother of Roberta who inherited these photos from her Aunt Florence.